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Issue/Question:
My 6-year-old daughter came home from a friend's house and said, "Alan asked me why I can't be Christian because Christians are the best. Are they better than we are?" I was angry that someone said that to her and confused about how to reply.

Suggested Response:

All children need to feel good about themselves and who they are. That sense of well-being is threatened when they are faced with confusing information or with an unkind remark or slur. You might talk with your daughter like this: "Our family's religion is not the same as Alan's family. His religion isn't better than ours, and ours isn't better than his. They're just different. Maybe we can invite Alan to celebrate one of our holidays with us some time so he can learn more about our religion." By addressing the issue calmly and directly, you can help your daughter learn ways to respond to such remarks if they happen again. By encouraging her to invite Alan to share in your holidays, you communicate your sense of pride about your religion.

In addition, you might want to consider calling Alan's parents to talk about his comment. Perhaps both families can talk together about their respective religions. In any case, you have an opportunity to help your daughter understand that no race, religion, or ethnicity is "better than" another, and that it is important that all people have the freedom to practice the religion of their choice. This experience can be used to help your daughter think more about your family's religious beliefs and how they are similar to and different from the beliefs of others. This can also be the beginning of your family's exploration of the world's religious diversity.
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