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Partner Organizations

Anti-Defamation League


Center for the Prevention of Hate Violence


The Leadership Conference Education Fund

Funded By

Office of Juvenile Deliquency Prevention U.S. Department of Justice


Safe and Drug Free Schools Program U.S. Department of Education

Funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and the U.S. Department of Education, Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program.

Issue/Question:
I don't see why we should have to teach diversity at all. Schools are for academic learning, not for imparting social values.

Suggested Response:

Children learn social values in school whether teachers consciously teach them or not. Both what is taught and what is not taught alters a child's perceptions of the world. Children who attend a school where the staff routinely neglects or dismisses diversity come away thinking that diversity is not important or that it is somehow bad. In a pluralistic society like ours, omitting the contributions of people from a variety of cultural groups tarnishes those groups and devalues their contributions. Teaching about diversity helps prepare children to live and work successfully in a pluralistic society.
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