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Partner Organizations

Anti-Defamation League


Center for the Prevention of Hate Violence


The Leadership Conference Education Fund

Funded By

Office of Juvenile Deliquency Prevention U.S. Department of Justice


Safe and Drug Free Schools Program U.S. Department of Education

Funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and the U.S. Department of Education, Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program.

Issue/Question:
I am uncomfortable with the idea of Black History Month. Why is it necessary? Isn't our goal to celebrate diversity all year round?

Suggested Response:

Black History Month and other commemorative months were created to ensure that we would hear and celebrate voices historically silenced in mainstream culture. While proponents maintain that one month a year is better than nothing, the goal should always be to integrate diversity throughout the year so that children are constantly learning about the valuable contributions of underrepresented or overlooked groups. You can help by including scientists, mathematicians, artists, writers, and others from diverse backgrounds throughout your curriculum.

Once diversity finds its way into our lives year-round, the impetus for special commemorations is likely to fade. Until such practice is standard, however, celebrations like Black History Month are a necessary means of educating people about the history and contributions of African Americans.
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