spacer_image About PAH
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spacer_image About Hate Crimes
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spacer_image Hate Response Network
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spacer_image Hate Crimes Database
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spacer_image Promising Programs
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Partner Organizations

Anti-Defamation League


Center for the Prevention of Hate Violence


Leadership Conference on Civil Rights Education Fund

Funded By

Office of Juvenile Deliquency Prevention U.S. Department of Justice


Safe and Drug Free Schools Program U.S. Department of Education

Funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and the U.S. Department of Education, Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program.

About Hate Crimes 
At its most fundamental level, hate violence is an aggressive expression of prejudice against another person or group of people simply because of who and what they are.
FBI Hate Crime Statistics The FBI's annual jurisdiction-by-juridiction breakdown of state, local, and college hate crime reporting offers the most comprehensive national picture currently available of the magnitude of the hate crime problem in America
 
The hate crime phenomenon presents complex and agonizing problems to communities nationwide. The problem has become more visible as federal and state officials increasingly track hate violence.

American communities have learned the hard way that failure to address bias crimes can cause an isolated incident to fester and result in widespread tension. Hate crimes are unique because they have a special emotional and physical impact that extends beyond the original victim. They intimidate others in the victim's community, causing them to feel isolated, vulnerable, and unprotected by the law. By making members of a specific group fearful, angry and suspicious, these crimes polarize cities and damage the very fabric of our society.

Learn More
Frequently Asked Questions About Hate Crimes and Hate on the Internet
Federal Overview - What is the federal response to hate crimes?
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